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 Gameguru Mania News - Apr,05 2017 -  
Blizzard defeats Cheat Maker, Wins $8.5 Million - briefly
(hx) 03:07 PM EDT - Apr,05 2017 - Post a comment / read (7)
The Gaming Company Blizzard Entertainment won a copyright case against the developers of several popular game cheats and hacks.The court ordered the company based in Germany named Bossland to pay over $8.5 million in damages. To stop further damage, Bossland is blocked from marketing and selling its cheats in the United States.This applies to hacks including Honorbuddy, Demonbuddy, Stormbuddy, Hearthbuddy, and Watchover Tyrant, as well as any other software designed to exploit Blizzard games.
Bossland materially contributes to infringement by creating the Bossland Hacks, making the Bossland Hacks available to the public, instructing users how to install and operate the Bossland Hacks, and enabling users to use the software to create derivative works

"Blizzard has established a showing of resulting damage or harm because Blizzard expends a substantial amount of money combating the use of the Bossland Hacks to ensure fair game play," the court writes.

Additionally, players of the Blizzard Games lodge complaints against cheating players, which has caused users to grow dissatisfied with the Blizzard Games and cease playing. Accordingly, the in-game cheating also harms Blizzard’s goodwill and reputation.
last 10 comments:
Tom(03:29 PM EDT - Apr,05 2017 )
Wow that's excellent, too bad EA, UbiSoft, Activision don't try and do the same thing. Instead they lie and the sheeple keep buying their crap. At least Blizzard proves it can be done!

In actuality this does nothing and wont prevent cheating because this A-hole can continue making the cheats. Still it will give him some problems.

th4t1guy(08:53 PM EDT - Apr,05 2017 )
You're telling me a larger company like Blizzard won a lawsuit against a one man company? I wonder how that could've happened....

WilderWein(05:03 AM EDT - Apr,06 2017 )
Thats pretty useless. Its a "GmbH". As such, it can only be charged to defined max, which mostly is between 25k to 50k € in personal capital. If the guy is in a funny mood, he just calls insolvency and starts a new company.

Tom(08:40 AM EDT - Apr,06 2017 )
th4t1guy> You're telling me a larger company like Blizzard won a lawsuit against a one man company? I wonder how that could've happened....

At least they put in a F'ing effort and they F'up this guys life for a bit, more than I can say for the cheating haven aka EA, Activision etc games.

Csimbi(04:34 PM EDT - Apr,06 2017 )
Seems pointless to me.
Much like pirates: you take down one site, three others grow in its place.
Plus, it's not really illegal - did this guy try to make money with it or something that it was a needle in the eyes of fucktards@blizzard?

Edit
quote:
Because Bossland decided not to represent itself, it was a relatively easy for Blizzard, which was awarded several million in copyright damages.

Haha, that's not a win, lol

quote:

The court agreed that hacks developed by Bossland effectively bypassed Blizzard’s cheat protection technology “Warden,” violating the DMCA. By reverse engineering the games and allowing users to play modified versions, Bossland infringed Blizzard’s copyrights and allowed its users to do the same.

This is interesting.
So, when you buy a game, you are required to agree to a lengthy legal text - most of which normal people can't understand.
So, the guy creating the hacks may have reversed the software, but a) he is probably not using it anymore and b) not doing anything that is illegal in Europe (I understand he's German).
The cheaters that are using the products have not reversed anything so they are not violating any copyright rubbish, no matter where they are.
So I am not seeing any sort of logic or a real 'win' here.
This case could have been thrown out of court easily. Too bad he decided not to show up...

quote:
“Bossland materially contributes to infringement by creating the Bossland Hacks, making the Bossland Hacks available to the public, instructing users how to install and operate the Bossland Hacks, and enabling users to use the software to create derivative works,” the court’s order reads (pdf).

We call that freedom of speech, lol
Derivative work? I highly doubt that. God mode and all that shit has been around for decades and it's not derivative work. It's reading/writing values into the memory at specific locations. No derivation whatsoever.

These fucktars@blizzard seems to be very desperate - maybe they are running out of ideas on protecting their turf. Well, if you design is bad, no one can help you. You should have hired architects that know how to design quality software!

Tom(08:45 AM EDT - Apr,07 2017 )
Csimbi> Seems pointless to me.
Much like pirates: you take down one site, three others grow in its place.
Plus, it's not really illegal - did this guy try to make money with it or something that it was a needle in the eyes of fucktards@blizzard?

Edit
quote:
Because Bossland decided not to represent itself, it was a relatively easy for Blizzard, which was awarded several million in copyright damages.

Haha, that's not a win, lol

quote:

The court agreed that hacks developed by Bossland effectively bypassed Blizzard’s cheat protection technology “Warden,” violating the DMCA. By reverse engineering the games and allowing users to play modified versions, Bossland infringed Blizzard’s copyrights and allowed its users to do the same.

This is interesting.
So, when you buy a game, you are required to agree to a lengthy legal text - most of which normal people can't understand.
So, the guy creating the hacks may have reversed the software, but a) he is probably not using it anymore and b) not doing anything that is illegal in Europe (I understand he's German).
The cheaters that are using the products have not reversed anything so they are not violating any copyright rubbish, no matter where they are.
So I am not seeing any sort of logic or a real 'win' here.
This case could have been thrown out of court easily. Too bad he decided not to show up...

quote:
“Bossland materially contributes to infringement by creating the Bossland Hacks, making the Bossland Hacks available to the public, instructing users how to install and operate the Bossland Hacks, and enabling users to use the software to create derivative works,” the court’s order reads (pdf).

We call that freedom of speech, lol
Derivative work? I highly doubt that. God mode and all that shit has been around for decades and it's not derivative work. It's reading/writing values into the memory at specific locations. No derivation whatsoever.

These fucktars@blizzard seems to be very desperate - maybe they are running out of ideas on protecting their turf. Well, if you design is bad, no one can help you. You should have hired architects that know how to design quality software!


You miss the point though. At least they DID something. Whether it's short-lived is another thing. This has caused this cheatmaker stress.

gx-x(09:40 AM EDT - Apr,08 2017 )
using the same Blizzard logic, regular players can sue Blizzard for allowing the possibility for their code to be circumvented, thus allowing for the cheating players to gain advantage.

PS. Dude didn't show because it would require him to spend money to travel to US and back and all the accompanying expenses. It would also mean that he acknowledges Blizzard's claim. Initially, "he" gave a statement that cheats were not advertised in the US, hence, he broke no law. Blizzard "won" imaginary case, and will receive imaginary money that they have "won".

I also don't like cheaters, and they are everywhere in online MP games. For that reason, I don't buy them.

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